MatthewLloydArchitects

“The architects take every opportunity to deliver the kind of details that make the difference between interesting architecture and the kind that engrosses...” Jay Merrick – The Independent.




Practice

Practice Profile

Matthew Lloyd Architects produces highly-designed built solutions for a broad client base and concentrates on social, affordable and commercial housing, schools and community buildings. The practice is well-resourced, with talented and committed professional staff.

Recent projects include Bishops Square in Spitalfields and Norfolk Park Green Homes in Sheffield; other projects include the award-winning St Paul’s Bow (featured in Pevsner’s Guide to East London 2005) and the Prince’s Foundation Headquarters in Shoreditch. Our work has been exhibited in Copenhagen, Paris, The Hague and at the V&A, the RIBA, The Building Centre and The Architecture Foundation in London.

Our collective attitude to design is central to our working process; we encourage clients to make relevant, sustainable, contemporary buildings. This approach cannot easily be associated with a particular style; rather, it is developed through the functional requirements of our buildings to create thoughtful, appropriate, bold architecture.

Practice Policies
The practice follows a policy of specifying environmentally friendly products and materials and promotes the use of energy-saving devices as far as these comply with the technical requirements and cost and time constraints of the client. A full version of our Environmental Policy is available on request.

The practice supports the principle of equality of opportunity in employment and seeks to avoid discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, religion, disability, age, or sexual orientation and believes that staff should receive equal pay for equal work. A full version of our Equal Opportunities Policy is available on request.

A copy of our Health and Safety Policy is available on request.

Working Methods
We are experienced team leaders and work closely with the consultant team to assess cost and programme implications of the brief throughout the project. We recognise the importance of good team coordination to achieve the client’s goals and work hard to ensure that meetings and communications are effective. We are always aware of time and budget constraints, coordinating with the design team to provide relevant advice and resourcing to prioritise delivery of projects to programme. We produce accurate, thorough and technically founded design information at each workstage. The partners remain the first point of contact for clients and maintain a close involvement in all projects.

Matthew Lloyd Architects has been certified as meeting the requirements of ISO 9001:2000 for the supply of Architects Services, certificate no. 181102, and is a member of the DETR’s Constructionline.




People


Partners

Matthew Lloyd

BArch DipArch RIBA

Matthew Lloyd established the practice in 1990. Educated at the Edinburgh College of Art School of Architecture, he has taught at the Royal College of Art and the University of Plymouth. Matthew has developed a practice with a marked social and ethical stance, producing modern, bold, appropriate architecture for social housing, schools, and community buildings primarily in East London. He is firmly committed to community-based urban regeneration and to the contribution of good design to quality of life. Matthew’s role as a partner is heavily invested in project development and design.

Patricia Woodward
BArch DipArch RIBA

Patricia Woodward joined Matthew Lloyd Architects in 1995 and became a Partner in 1998. Educated at the Edinburgh College of Art School of Architecture, she has taught at the Universities of Greenwich and Plymouth. Patricia’s role as a partner focuses on project development and she is responsible for quality management and maintaining standards within the practice. She has experience working in a range of architectural fields including large scale estate regeneration work, mixed and public sector housing, community projects and education. Patricia has expertise in a wide range of participation techniques and is committed to working closely with user groups to ensure that all stakeholders have the opportunity to contribute to the process.

Alex Sherratt
BA DipArch RIBA

Alex Sherratt joined Matthew Lloyd Architects in 2001 and became a Partner in 2004. Alex is responsible for project delivery and has proven experience working on projects with complex client structures and briefs. Alex was Project Architect for the award-winning conversion of St Paul’s Old Ford, in East London which developed a run down Victorian church into community facilities including an art gallery, fitness centre, café and community hall. Alex presented this project at an Urban Regeneration conference in The Hague, at the invitation of REURBA. Amongst other projects, he is currently involved with the delivery of a new build apartment block and mixed-use refurbishment in Bishop’s Square, Spitalfields, which is due to complete in Autumn 2008.

Claire Warnock
BA DipArch RIBA

Anna joined Matthew Lloyd Architects in 2001 and was made an associate of the practice in 2005. She has worked on many of the practice’s key projects in recent years and had a major role in developing the architecture for Norfolk Park Green Homes. Anna continues to play a strong part in the development of the practice in all its aspects. She has taught extensively at the University of Plymouth, as part of our on-going relationship with its architecture department.

Associates

Anna Schabel
CandArch DipArch RIBA

Claire Warnock joined Matthew Lloyd Architects in 2002 and became a partner in 2008. Claire is responsible for project delivery and has wide experience in supporting client groups to develop a project from the earliest stages. Claire was Project Architect for the award-winning Tab Centre in Shoreditch, East London where she worked closely with the church steering group to develop the brief and produce an appropriate, fundable design. Claire is particularly interested in Sustainable Design, materials and techniques and is currently responsible for the construction and completion of the Norfolk Park Green Homes project in Sheffield for the Tower Hamlets Environment Trust, due to complete in Autumn 2008.



Events

Clean Up 2006


An event about architectural context and the urban environment for the London Architecture Biennale 2006, by Matthew Lloyd Architects, with Price & Myers, Archaos, and street artists Moose and George. Countering the trend for temporary sculptural design installations, we swept and scrubbed the pavements and repaired and painted benches and railings in Clerkenwell Green to improve the quality of this public space. Moose and George contributed their trademark ‘clean grafitti’. The event is featured in ‘Dirt: new geographies of cleanliness and contamination’, ed. Ben Campkin and Rosie Cox, I.B. Taurus.

Strong City 2006

A conference on realising the potential of church buildings, held at St John at Hackney in Clapton, East London. The practice organised the conference in partnership with English Heritage, the Diocese of London, and the Shaftesbury Society, in response to demand arising from ‘A City to Dwell In’ (below). The event was sponsored by AtisReal.

A City to Dwell In 2005

A conference held at St Paul’s Bow to discuss the future of church buildings in urban regeneration and to debate how religious buildings can have the widest relevance and usefulness to people in cities. Matthew Lloyd Architects organised the event in partnership with English Heritage, the Diocese of London, and the Shaftesbury Society.



Press Coverage

Publication Project Date
     
Property Week Bishops Square Mar 2008
The Times Bishops Square Sep 2007
London Evening Standard Bishops Square Sep 2007
Building Design Earl’s Court Youth Club Jul 2007
Building Design Bishops Square Feb 2007
Arkitekten St Paul’s Bow May 2006
Building Design Norfolk Park Green Homes May 2006
Church Buildings Tab Centre Nov 2005
Architecture Today Tab Centre Oct 2005
School Buildings Randal Cremer School Sep 2005
School Buildings Thomas Jones School Jun 2005
L’architecture d’aujourd’hui St Paul’s Bow Oct 2004
FX St Paul’s Bow Oct 2004
Architectural Review St Paul’s Bow Sep 2004
Inside Housing Haslerigge Housing Sep 2004
Building Design St Paul’s Bow Aug 2004
Church Buildings St Paul’s Bow Jul 2004
The Independent St Paul’s Bow May 2004
The Architects’Journal Prince’s Foundation Aug 2000

Books
Dirt: new geographies of cleanliness and contamination, ed Ben Campkin, IBTauris 2008
Architecture in Detail, by Graham Bizley, Architectural Press 2007
Architectural Voices, by David Littlefield and Saskia Lewis, Wiley 2007
Converted Churches, Tectum Press, 2007
Pevsner’s Guide to London: East, vol 5, ed B Cherry, 2005
New London Architecture, by Kenneth Powell, Merrell 2001
New Architects, The Architecture Foundation 1998
New British Architecture, The Architecture Foundation 1994

Published Articles
‘a building should be to the city as a brick to a brick wall’, xxxx, 2008
Scroope 14 (Cambridge Architecture Journal), 2002

Exhibitions
Des Res at New London Architecture, The Building Centre, Apr 2008
Composites at CAUE 92, Sceaux, France, May 2008
On The Threshold at the V&A, Nov 2006
Sustainable Living at the RIBA July 2006
Changing London Schools at BDP, June 2006



Clients


Blackheath Conservatoire
Capital & Provident
CEA@Islington
Constable Group Ltd
Durkan Ltd
Earl’s Court Youth Club
Edgewater Group
Environment Trust
Feathers Clubs Association
Genesis Housing Group
Governors of Gunnersbury Catholic School
Governors of Hindhayes School
Governors of Servite Primary School
Hammerson UK Plc
Land Use Consultants Ltd
Learning Trust for Hackney
Limehouse Town Hall Consortium
London Borough of Tower Hamlets
London Diocesan Board
London & Quadrant Housing Trust
Native Land
Notting Dale Partnership
Octavia Hill Housing Association
Peabody Trust
Prince’s Foundation
Providence Row Housing Association
Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea
St Barnabas, Homerton PCC
St David’s Holloway, PCC
St Mary of Eton PCC
St Mary Stoke Newington PCC
St Paul’s Bow PCC
Sanctuary Housing Association
Sheffield City Council
Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church
Spitalfields Market Community Trust
Spitalfields Market Opera Trust
Somerset County Council
Swanley Town Council
Tamarisk Trust
Toynbee Housing Association
Urban Catalyst




Contact


1 The Hangar
Perseverance Works
38 Kingsland Road
London E2 8DD

T 020 7613 1934
F 020 7613 1434

mail@matthewlloyd.co.uk




Community / Historic Building / St Paul's, Old Ford

2001 – 2004

Project
St Paul's, Old Ford

Category
Community / Historic Building

Client
St. Paul’s Old Ford PCC

Status
Completed 2004

Location
London E3

Cost
£3.5m

In 2001, Matthew Lloyd Architects was appointed by the PCC of St Paul with St Mark Old Ford to be architects for its ‘New Heart for Bow’ community project, revitilising a derelict Victorian church, enabling it to contribute to and thrive within the diverse community it serves. The finished design is a model of multi-tasking, delivering a mixed-use building which includes an art gallery and project room, gym, physical therapy and counselling rooms, a small community hall, a crèche, a café, an office, and even a sauna.

The central feature is the art gallery, in the shape of a boat, or ark, built of tulipwood supported on curving steel columns. It is...

“the star turn, an architectural intervention that is satisfying in terms of its form and in its occasionally delightful details. It has real presence, yet somehow doesn’t shatter the dynamics of the remaining portion of nave; the curving, six-bayed wall behind the altar still retains its own atmosphere. The architects take every opportunity to deliver the kind of details that make the difference between interesting architecture and the kind that engrosses.”
(Jay Merrick in The Independent, 13/05/04)

‘Stylish, thrilling …”
(Rob Gregory in Architectural Review, Sept 2004)

"une mise en oeuvre de grande qualite qui leur semblait prioritaire pour le projet, symbole d’un nouveau depart pour le quartier".
(L’architecture d’aujourd’hui, Sept-Oct 2004)

Fundraising for the project was provided by the New Opportunities Fund, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Community Fund, and local diocesan resources.

Winner
RICS Community Benefit Award: 2005 London Region

Highly Commended
RICS Community Benefit Award: 2005 National
Wood Awards 2004

Shortlisted
FX International Interior Design Awards
ACE RIBA Awards 2007





Housing
/ Brick Lane Housing

1997

Project
Brick Lane Housing

Category
Housing

Client
Providence Row Housing Association

Status
Completed 1997

Location
London E1

Cost
£750k

In 1995 Providence Row Housing Association, a long-established charity working with London’s homeless, invited Matthew Lloyd Architects to identify possible sites for a new building to be constructed under the then government’s Rough Sleepers initiative. The practice found an L-shaped bombsite located on Brick Lane with an existing disused pub on its corner, which was subsequently purchased by PRHA.

The design for the building is particularly clear in its intentions: to create the maximum number of flats for ex-rough sleepers, around a secure and robust courtyard block, out of a minimal and fixed budget. A singular pallet of materials was used to reinforce these aims: one type of brickwork, galvanised steelwork access balconies and coloured timber windows. Contemporary elevations to the perimeter of the building respond to the vertical rhythm of the streetscape, whilst the inner courtyard space acts as a quiet sanctuary.

At the top of the building, an aluminium clad mansard roof provides a new interpretation of the ‘weavers attics’ integral to the urban fabric of Spitalfields. Ten years on, the building is very much part of the Brick Lane street scene, with a thriving and popular corner coffee shop occupying the ground floor of the converted pub.





Community
/ Earl’s Court Youth Club

2005 – 2006

Project
Earl’s Court Youth Club

Category
Community

Client
Earl’s Court Youth Club

Status
Completed 2006

Location
London SW10

Cost
£195k

The Earl’s Court Youth Club provides after-school and holiday care and activities for children aged 8-16, as well as night classes for local adults and is a valuable resource for disadvantaged residents in a largely affluent borough. Matthew Lloyd Architects were appointed to refurbish this late 1970s purpose-built youth club to increase disabled access, to improve and rationalise internal spaces, and to make the entrance more visible and welcoming.

The new design relocates the administrative spaces, previously hidden in the back basement, to the ground floor, placing them centrally within the façade. Visibility and light have been maximised throughout, improving supervision as well as making the whole building much brighter.

A light, open façade complements the newly achieved sense of spaciousness within. The doorway was extended to form a new double-height opening with a bright yellow threshold for which we used actual luminous roadworks paint. To add to the Club’s street presence, a new canopy is painted grey with a bright pink and apple green underside. The colours lend movement to the design, changing according to the position of the person approaching, and were inspired by Bridget Riley and Op Art.





Community
/ The Harrow Club

1999

Project
The Harrow Club

Category
Community

Client
Harrow Club Community Centre

Status
Completed 1999

Location
London W10

Cost
£1.7m

The Harrow Club is located within a Grade II listed building designed by Norman Shaw in the late 19th century. Matthew Lloyd Architects was appointed to undertake a major refurbishment of the existing youth and community centre. The practice worked together with the client to develop the brief and successfully secured funding from the Sports Lottery, Harrow Mission, charitable funds and RBK&C. The users and managers of the club have had significant input into the layout, finishes and colours used. New facilities include a multi-purpose sports hall, a dance studio, an internet café, teaching spaces and offices.

The architecture redefines the circulation of the building to make open, simple, calm interiors whilst revealing and celebrating Norman Shaw’s original work. The building project was completed in summer 1999. The Club is now one of west London’s most successful youth centres, offering a wide range of activities including sport, community skills, dance, art, and digital music training.





Housing
/ Haselrigge Housing

2002 – 2004

Project
Haselrigge Housing

Category
Housing

Client
London & Quadrant Housing Association

Status
Completed 2004

Location
London SW9

Haselrigge is one of a number of redundant Edwardian school premises in the London Borough of Lambeth, and in 2001 its education department put the site on the open market for conversion to residential use. London & Quadrant Housing Trust commissioned Matthew Lloyd Architects to design the social housing element of the development as part of a Section 106 requirement for the site. The resultant project is a 22 unit new-build general needs scheme providing a mixture of 2-bedroom flats and large family houses.

The design focuses on space planning, natural light, and the provision of good views to the outside, whilst valuing protected private space for the residents. The elevations are clear in organisation; colour and texture are provided through the use of a combination of brickwork, timber cladding and seamed metal roof coverings.

Funding was provided through the Housing Corporation and construction was completed in August 2004 under a PPC 2000 form of contract.





Housing
/ James Taylor Building

2006 – 2010

Project
James Taylor Building

Category
Housing

Client
Constable House Ltd and Sanctuary Housing Association

Status
In planning

Location
London E8

Cost
£12m

The James Taylor Building is an existing warehouse located within the Morningside Estate in Hackney. Matthew Lloyd Architects was appointed by Constable House Ltd in partnership with Sanctuary Housing Association, landowners of the Morningside Estate, to develop the warehouse site as a mixed use building providing a regeneration focus for the area.

The proposed development comprises 70 residential units, ranging from 1 bed to 4 bed flats, and ground floor B1 space, together with ancillary spaces and basement car parking. The scheme includes a communal green space, private patios and balconies, and a south-facing play space at ground level. A combination of green roofs and planted balconies provide visual amenity to neighbouring properties.

The patterning of the elevations draws inspiration from the vibrancy, colours and diversity of adjacent Well Street Market. Using a pattern that slowly dissolves from dark at the bottom to light at the top recreates this lightness and vibrancy. Visually, this tile pattern animates the facades and reduces the size of the building by merging it with the sky.




Housing
/ Estates Plus regeneration

2008

Project
Estates Plus regeneration

Category
Housing

Client
Southern Housing Group

Status
Competition

Location
London E2

The layout of the St John’s Estate is typical of much of the modernist housing of its time: slab-like blocks arranged around the site to form large courts, and peppered with three tower blocks which dominate the local urban scene. The buildings are set back from the natural pavement line, bereft of street edges. This open land and the often windswept courtyards give the estate an isolated feeling, with almost no personally cared-for open space.

Our design seeks primarily to make sense of these open spaces, ‘knitting’ them together to define proper ownership, both public and private, and to create a high quality and secure place to live. For three sites, we have designed appropriately scaled housing blocks to suit this very urban part of central London, never smaller than three storeys high, and never taller than seven storeys. We have chosen this scale in order to ‘urbanise’ the estate, to increase its density, and to put in place a traditional street pattern to define boundaries between the public realm and the private domestic spaces contained behind the facades of buildings.

Our building proposals have strong vertical facades, sitting on the back line of normal pavement widths, presenting a firm face on the street side. Facades are entered through smart, secure communal lobbies leading to flats. Rear and side elevations are less defensive, opening up with balconies and glazed facades; at the rear ground floor there are private gardens for family apartments.





Housing / Mixed Use
/ Mildmay/Shoreditch Tabernacle

2004 – 2010

Project
Mildmay/Shoreditch Tabernacle

Category
Housing / Mixed Use

Client
Genesis Housing Group

Status
In development

Location
London E2

Cost
£40m

Matthew Lloyd Architects is working within a consortium to develop this major project on the Mildmay/Shoreditch Tabernacle site in Shoreditch, to create a range of residential, social and community facilities. Development began in 2005 and will be completed by 2012. One of the practice’s components is a new church with a block of flats above, connected to the practice’s already complete Tab community centre.

This proposed building will become an important part of the local street scene, drawing on monastic precedents, without loudly exclaiming ‘church’. The worship space within is protected from the busy context by heavy masonry walls, expressed through the deep reveals to set back windows. The church inside is an unexpected polygonal space, periodically lit by shafts of light from the south.

The consortium comprises Genesis Housing Group, Mildmay Mission Hospital, and Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church. Other buildings on the site are designed by FCBStudios.





Housing
/ Norfolk Park Green Homes

2004 – 2008

Project
Norfolk Park Green Homes

Category
Housing

Client
The Environment Trust

Status
Completion summer 2008

Location
Sheffield

Cost
£5m

In 2004, Matthew Lloyd Architects won an invited competition to design a residential development on a brownfield site in south Sheffield, for The Environment Trust in partnership with Sheffield City Council. The scheme comprises 47 residential units in a tenure mix determined in consultation with the Local Residents Association and comprising 14 one-bedroom flats, 18 two-bedroom flats, and 15 three-bedroom houses. Excellent use of the sloping site maximizes the residents’ views westwards over the city centre of Sheffield.

The design focuses on layout, house plan flexibility, low-energy systems, site access, sun-path orientation and landscape design to offer genuinely sustainable, affordable homes to local people. Timber-clad houses with a strong colour scheme give the neighbourhood a distinctive character. The project seeks to create a community where people can enjoy easy interaction with their neighbours, whilst having a sense of personal security within clearly defined private spaces.

A thoughtfully landscaped public green space forms a centrepiece for the development and includes dewponds and indigenous planting, benches, footpaths, and swales with reeds and water plants. A Sustainable Urban Drainage System (SUDS) is included in the scheme: rainwater pipes feed the ponds which feed underground water storage, finally running down the site in a series of swales that encourage the evaporation and soaking away of water.

The Norfolk Park Green Homes scheme has featured in two exhibitions:

. Sustainable Living’ at the RIBA in July 2006
. On the Threshold’ at the V&A in November 2006.





Education / Historic Building
/ The Prince’s Foundation

1998 – 2000

Project
The Prince’s Foundation

Category
Education / Historic Building

Client
The Prince’s Foundation

Status
Completed 2000

Location
London EC2

Cost
£3m

Matthew Lloyd Architects was appointed by the Prince of Wales Foundation in 1998 to design its new headquarters; previously the practice had worked with the client to advise on a suitable building and to define a brief. The completed project was handed over in February 2000.

The practice ensured that the design reflected the aspirations of the Foundation: its derelict Victorian warehouse has been stripped back to its original spaces, timber floors have been recycled and windows were replaced in the pattern of the old. Contemporary elements include a six storey steel staircase, a brick entrance ramp and rotating steel ventilation cowls mounted on the roof. The building is entirely passively cooled through vertical air shafts located on either side of the plan. The finished ground floor provides a café and gallery space, open to the public. The fourth floor has been designed as a lecture room and drawing studio. The remaining floors incorporate a library, architecture studios and meeting rooms.

“The transformation by Matthew Lloyd Architects remains as a model of the old and the modern and a seminal demonstration of how architectural excellence can be achieved through a sophisticated exploitation of absence and ordinariness.”
Architects Journal August 2000





Education
/ Randal Cremer Primary School

2003 – 2004

Project
Randal Cremer Primary School

Category
Education

Client
The Learning Trust, on behalf of London Borough of Hackney

Status
Completed 2004

Location
London E2

Cost
£900k

A project to expand and improve the premises of Randal Cremer School in East London was won in competition in July 2003. The brief was to increase the capacity of the school by 120 pupils, enabling its expansion from a 1.5 form to 2 form entry, and to improve security and disabled access throughout the school.The scheme was developed following consultation with The Learning Trust and the school, with presentations to staff, parents and pupils over a 6 month period.

The brief is met by adding three new classrooms: two within the existing building (reconfiguring odd-sized classrooms and utilising unused space) and one in an extension which also houses a secure entrance foyer, an administrative office, and the Head Teacher’s office.
The single storey extension sits within an existing brick boundary wall and overlooks the street. Patent glazing set in the roof above the foyer and the classroom allows extra light into the building and creates inspirational spaces for the school. The extension is sited on a narrow strip of land connecting the Infants’ and Juniors’ play areas, thus having a minimal impact on available play space.

Exhibition:
‘Changing London Schools’
Architecture Foundation
June 2006





Community / Historic Building
/ St Barnabas Centre

2005 – 2009

Project
St Barnabas Centre

Category
Community / Historic Building

Client
St Barnabas Homerton, DCC

Status
Phase 1 on site

Location
London E9

In Homerton, a rather neglected part of the London Borough of Hackney, the listed St Barnabas Church and its charmingly rural grounds are important elements of both the local streetscape and the local greenspace provision. Alongside DDA-required internal alterations to the church, Matthew Lloyd Architects have been commissioned to design a new church centre with community facilities.

The principle aims of the project are to produce a welcoming and flexible centre; one which can cater for a number of different public and private groups while enhancing and allowing greater enjoyment of the churchyard.

Retaining the nature of the site has become central to the scheme. The new public rooms open onto a landscaped courtyard which links the Centre to the church and stimulates connections between the new building and its environs. Planted roofs provide a garden setting for all views from the upper floor of the Church and adjacent buildings.

Completion is due in 2009.





Housing / Mixed Use / Historic Building
/ Bishops Square

2004 – 2008

Project
Bishops Square

Category
Housing / Mixed Use / Historic Building

Client
Hammerson UK Plc and Native Land Ltd

Status
On-site

Location
London E1

Cost
£5.3m

Following an invited competition in 2003, Hammerson Plc appointed Matthew Lloyd Architects to resolve a long-standing design problem in Spital Square: how to accommodate both the aesthetic demands of the Grade II listed St Botolph’s Hall and the commercial objectives of the site’s owners.

The resulting design proposes a simple, handsome apartment building facing onto Bishop’s Square, leaving a clear gap between itself and the Hall. Within the gap a transparent single storey glass structure is created, sitting in place of the site’s original Curate’s House. The design protects the status of the Hall within its new commercial setting, and increases its importance within Spital Square, while the new building responds to the corporate steel and glass buildings rising high above the site. On the south side of the Hall, there is a new courtyard providing an outdoor eating space and an entrance to the flats in the new building. A second small mixed-use building designed by MLA will be built on the west side of the courtyard, along Stothard Place.

The project started on site in Summer 2006. Completion is due in Autumn 2008.





Housing / Community / Historic Building
/ St Mary of Eton, Hackney Wick

2007 – 2011

Project
St Mary of Eton, Hackney Wick

Category
Housing / Community / Historic Building

Client
PCC of St Mary of Eton and St Augustine’s

Status
Stage D planning

Location
London E9

Cost
£6-8m

St Mary of Eton is a Grade II* listed church built for the Eton College Mission in the late 19th century. The church and its ancillary buildings are a rare example of historic fabric in the area and are much loved by the community, but have fallen increasingly into disrepair. Matthew Lloyd Architects was appointed in 2007 to develop a design that will enable the buildings to respond to existing and emerging community need.

The proposed development involves the creation of 3 new buildings, including 31 residential units ranging from 1bed to 4bed flats, as well as a new church centre, community facilities and extensive re-landscaping.

The new buildings are designed to embrace and enclose the church site, rather like a monastic settlement, with a wrapping skin of cladding created to surround the scheme and unite the new ensemble. The church, at the heart of the development, will be restored and rejuvenated, set within a welcoming courtyard with a café and sensitively designed gardens. Developed in close consultation with the community, the design has authority and integrity as well as architectural beauty. The vibrant mix of landscaping, residential units, and modern community resources will act as a catalyst for the regeneration of the whole area.





Community / Historic Building
/ The Tab Centre

2002 – 2005

Project
The Tab Centre

Category
Community / Historic Building

Client
Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church

Status
Completed 2005

Location
London E2

Cost
£1.2m

Shoreditch Tabernacle Baptist Church Hall is a Grade II listed Victorian building, which suffered bomb damage in 1944 and was neglected thereafter, falling into an ever-worsening state of disrepair. Matthew Lloyd Architects was selected by invited interview to restore the Hall as a church asset whilst creating a valuable resource within the local community.

The completed project includes rehearsal, performance, arts and meeting spaces and office spaces rented to charitable organisations. The original caretaker’s flat was also redeveloped to provide further rental income.

The practice has taken considerable care to create a scheme that will meet modern requirements while sensitively restoring a rare and valuable Victorian building type. Following a 10 month construction project, the refurbishment was completed and re-opened in July 2005 as The Tab Centre.

“This is an approach to old buildings that is both modest and assertive. The architects have not simply used the building as a provocation for a contemporary intervention, but have worked to highlight its best qualities, and explored the latent potential of its spaces.” (Chris Foges in Architecture Today, October 2005)

Winner:
RICS Community Benefit Award
2006 London Region





Masterplanning
/ Green Community County Durham

2007

Project
The Prince’s Foundation

Category
Education

Client
Confidential

Status
In development

Location
County Durham

A landowner in County Durham approached Matthew Lloyd Architects in 2007 having learned about our Sheffield Green Homes project. We have been asked to draw up a design and site analysis for a holistic, genuinely sustainable development project comprising housing, education, health and employment facilities on the outskirts of a very deprived former mining community. Our client’s ambition is to create one of Europe’s first truly sustainable developments in order to regenerate the struggling remnants of what was once a thriving community. Our resulting plans create a mix of uses designed from a low energy standpoint, using the natural characteristics of the site to reduce the scheme’s carbon footprint. This includes the creation of a continuous linear woodland windbreak, complete Sustainable Urban Drainage System and reed bed sewage treatment and comprehensive district heating powered by woodchip boilers through coppice planting. The plan also feeds directly into existing and established allotment gardens to benefit from locally sourced food supplied through a farm shop. In urban design terms, new roads feed into established street patterns, whilst encouraging cycle routes and homes zones throughout.





Housing / Special Needs
/ Tamarisk Trust

2006 – 2010

Project
Tamarisk Trust

Category
Special Needs Housing

Client
The Tamarisk Trust in partnership with Sanctuary Housing Association

Status
Stage D planning

Location
London Borough of Barnet

Cost
£3.5m

The Tamarisk Trust in partnership with Sanctuary Housing Association appointed Matthew Lloyd Architects in 2006 to develop a site in Barnet as residential accommodation for adults with learning difficulties. The proposed scheme involves the demolition of an existing property and the building of 2 new facilities: a registered care facility for 10 people with Down Syndrome and dementia, and a supported housing unit of self contained bed-sits for 20 people with learning disabilities. The registered housing requires facilities which respond to the high dependency of the occupants, while the supported housing service requires facilities which enable the residents’ independence, with an emphasis on self-contained accommodation.

A significant aspect of the design is that the buildings provide a safe and welcoming environment, familiar and homely. The circulation for each building is clear and easily understood, with corridors following the axis of the garden wall, and stairs and lifts located opposite each other at the centre of the building. An enclosed garden acts as a hub and shared amenity space for all the residents.

The character of the building towards the street is formal in scale and language, drawing on traditional suburban aesthetics for its architectural expression. However, the copper cladding shows it to be a modern interpretation suggestive of materiality, modern technology and sustainability. Beyond the garden wall, the emphasis is on openness and landscape: all shared lounges and dining areas have views over the garden; the mass of the building breaks down into a series of roof gardens to provide outside amenity at several floor levels. Green walls and green roofs are a key part of the design. This technology provides a means to harvest rainwater and natural habitats for local wildlife, blurring the edge between the building and its surrounding landscape. The scheme is intended to achieve a very high Code for Sustainable Homes rating.





Housing
/ Marketing Suite

2007

Project
Marketing Suite

Category
Housing

Client
Confidential

Status
Feasibility

Cost
£10m

This project was an invited competition between 6 prominent practices to design the marketing suite for a large luxury development in London. The brief was to provide an outstanding, signature building to display finished apartments, as well as provide a sales and marketing suite with boardroom facilities. The brief was for a very high quality and demountable building set within a parkland landscape.

The practice was invited, as a second-interview finalist, to present refined designs to an interview panel; the presentation included this Computer Generated Design of the proposals. Although Matthew Lloyd Architects were runners up in this case, the panel recognised that the proposals demonstrated very high quality design and innovation, produced in an extremely short period of time.




Education
/ Springfield Community Primary School

2007 – 2008

Project
Springfield Community Primary School

Category
Education

Client
The Learning Trust, on behalf of London Borough of Hackney

Status
Phase I completed May 2008 Phase II completes winter 2008

Location
London N16

Cost
£1.2m

This project for the modernisation of this well known primary school in the London Borough of Hackney, part of the ‘Fresh Start’ programme, was won under competitive interview. Prior to the works, the school was run-down, requiring modernisation and improvements to accessibility throughout.

As well as upgrading the school’s original Edwardian fabric, the brief included the demolition of two existing 1960s classroom wings which, although of aesthetic merit, substantially failed DfES space standards and offered a poor teaching environment. Our architectural solution was to emulate the shape and personality of the original wings, interpreted as a child friendly, bright, optimistic and accessible aesthetic. The new accommodation is spacious and modern, clad in untreated green oak and proprietary render, with aluminium powder-coated windows.

Upon completion, the 1st east wing was occupied immediately and has been embraced by children and staff alike. Phase II, a second similar west wing, and the refurbishment of the retained buildings follow straight onwards.





Community / Historic Building
/ St. Mary’s Old Church

2006 – 2010

Project
St. Mary’s Stoke Newington Old Church

Category
Community / Historic Building

Client
St. Mary’s PCC

Status
Stage D planning

Location
London N16

Cost
£2m

St Mary’s Old Church is a Grade II* listed church on the South East edge of Clissold Park in Stoke Newington. The Church has a rich architectural history with Medieval origins, although it has been altered several times over the centuries. Since the building of a much larger church of St Mary across the road in 1858, the Old Church has essentially become a Chapel of Ease, used for occasional worship and concerts.

It is the intention of St Mary’s PCC to revive the Old Church to be an active and sustainable part of the Stoke Newington community. In so doing, the church will attract and be appreciated by a wider audience, creating the means to generate resources to maintain the condition of the ageing church fabric. Matthew Lloyd Architects won a competitive interview in 2006 to work on new plans to create a Community Arts Centre within a restored and rejuvenated site.

The proposals provide a contemporary response that is sensitive to the Old Church, while responding to, and enhancing, the listed fabric. A new oak-clad extension will create a flexible multi-use space available for use for alternative forms of worship, concerts and performances, rehearsal and function space, and for use by existing and future community groups. The original historic fabric will be repaired and restored and all of the building’s services will be carefully replaced.